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Newfoundland dog history : The dogs which take their name from the island of Newfoundland appeal to all lovers of animals, romance, and beauty. A Newfoundland formed the subject of perhaps the most popular picture painted by Sir Edwin Landseer.

 

Innumerable are the accounts of Newfoundland Dog History are the dogs having proved their devotion to their owners, and of the many lives saved by them in river and sea; and when Sir Edwin Landseer selected one of the breed as the subject of his picture entitled, "A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society," he was justified not only by the sentiment attaching to this remarkable race of dogs, but also by the deeds by which Newfoundlands have made good their claim to such great distinction, and the popular recognition of this, no doubt, in some degree added to the great esteem in which this painting has alwaysbeen held.

 

Varieties of breed in Newfoundland Dog History

In Newfoundland dog history there were two established varieties, the black and the white and black. There are also bronze-coloured dogs, but they are rare and are not favoured. It is stated, however, that puppies of that colour are generally the most promising in all other respects. Click here for Pictures of the Newfoundland Dog

 

Standards In Newfoundland Dog History

The head should be broad and massive, but in no sense heavy in appearance. The muzzle should be short, square, and clean cut, eyes rather wide apart, deep set, dark and small, not showing any haw; ears small, with close side carriage, covered with fine short hair (there should be no fringe to the ears), expression full of intelligence, dignity, and kindness.

The body should be long, square, and massive, loins strong and well filled; chest deep and broad; legs quite straight, somewhat short in proportion to the length of the body, and powerful, with round bone well covered with muscle; feet large, round, and close.

The tail should be only long enough to reach just below the hocks, free from kink, and never curled over the back. The quality of the coat is very important; the coat should be very dense, with plenty of undercoat; the outer coat somewhat harsh and quite straight. A curly coat is very objectionable. A dog with a good coat may be in the water fora considerable time without getting wet on the skin.

 

Historical Size Of The Newfoundlander

As regards to size in Newfoundland Dog Hisotry , the Newfoundland Club standard gives 140 lbs. to 120 lbs. weight for a dog, and 110 lbs. to 120 lbs. for a bitch, with an average height at the shoulder of 27 inches and 25 inches respectively; but it is doubtful whether dogs in proper condition do conform to both requirements.

At any rate, the writer is unable to trace any prominent Newfoundlands which do, and it would be safe to assume that for dogs of the weights specified, the height should be quite 29 inches for dogs, and 27 inches for bitches. A dog weighing 150 lbs. and measuring 29 inches in height at the shoulder would necessarily be long in body to be in proportion, and would probably much nearer approach the ideal form of a Newfoundland than a taller dog.

 

Puppies From Newfoundland Dog History

When rearing puppies give them soft food, such as well-boiled rice and milk, as soon as they will lap, and, shortly afterwards, scraped lean meat. Newfoundland puppies require plenty of meat to induce proper growth. The puppies should increase in weight at the rate of 3 lbs. a week, and this necessitates plenty of flesh, bone and muscle-forming food, plenty of meat, both raw and cooked. Milk is also good, but it requires to be strengthened with Plasmon, or casein.

The secret of growing full-sized dogs with plenty of bone and substance is to get a good start from birth, good feeding, warm, dry quarters, and freedom for the puppies to move about and exercise themselves as they wish. Forced exercise may make them go wrong on their legs. Medicine should not be required except for worms, and the puppies should be physicked for these soon after they are weaned, and again when three or four months old, or before that if they are not thriving. If free from worms, Newfoundland puppies will be found quite hardy, and, under proper conditions of food and quarters, they are easy to rear.


Note's:: This is the end of our information of Newfoundland Dog History. You may also be interested in a general overview of the History of Dogs.

Related Articles:

Learn about the history of the English Bulldog

History of the Englilsh Mastiff

The History of the St. Bernard

 

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